archiemcphee:

Bangkok-based photographer Visarute Angkatavanich (previously featured here) continues to take breathtaking photos of Siamese fighting fish, also known as betta fish. His fascination with their splendid, flowing fins and brilliant coloring is apparent in the extraordinarily detailed portraits he creates. The photos are so perfectly clear and close-up that it’s easy to forget the fish are underwater and not floating in midair.

Angkatavanich recently told Popular Photography that he only started photographing the fish after encountering them for the first time three years ago at a fish show and has since become obsessed with the different species which vary greatly in size, shape, and color patterns.

Head over to Visarute Angkatavanich’s 500px gallery to view more of his gorgeous betta portraits. Limited edition prints of his photos are currently available through La Lanta Fine Art.

[via Colossal]

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beanstation:

Traditional Music Outlander Mix. Listen here. 

beanstation:

Traditional Music Outlander Mix. Listen here. 

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becausebirds:

oh boy oh boy oh boy

becausebirds:

oh boy oh boy oh boy

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unclemother:

IM SCREAMING

unclemother:

IM SCREAMING

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mindblowingscience:

How Many Lakes on Earth? Researchers Finally Know

Until now, no one knew for sure how many lakes exist on Earth.
Blame geography — most of the world’s lakes are in places where humans don’t live, said David Seekell, an environmental scientist at Umea University in Sweden. “This is something one would have assumed had been done long ago, and was in a textbook somewhere,” Seekell said.
Lake size was a liability, too. Millions of lakes are too small for mapmakers to bother charting.
Instead of counting lake by lake, earlier estimates were statistical guesses, based on the number of lakes in a parcel of land or on average lake size. One widely cited study from 2006 estimated the lake total at 304 million.
A new study published Sept. 16 in the journa Geophysical Research Letters sidesteps these problems. With high-resolution satellite data and supercomputers to check every cloudless pixel, researchers now have the best count yet of lakes on Earth. The result? There are 117 million lakes in the world.
Yet the bodies of water cover more land (3.7 percent of Earth’s surface) than previous studies had predicted. This is because quite a few medium- to large-size lakes were missing from the databases used for previous studies.
About 90 million of the lakes fall in the smallest size category, measuring 0.5 to 2.5 acres (0.2 to 1 hectare), the study reports. That’s equal to a country house lot, a large farm pond or 1.9 American football fields.
"Most lakes are in the far North, and there’s actually quite a few of them," said Seekell, a co-author of the new study. "Even if they’re small and no one sees them, they are potentially important for global-scale environmental issues like the carbon budget," he told Live Science.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

How Many Lakes on Earth? Researchers Finally Know

Until now, no one knew for sure how many lakes exist on Earth.

Blame geography — most of the world’s lakes are in places where humans don’t live, said David Seekell, an environmental scientist at Umea University in Sweden. “This is something one would have assumed had been done long ago, and was in a textbook somewhere,” Seekell said.

Lake size was a liability, too. Millions of lakes are too small for mapmakers to bother charting.

Instead of counting lake by lake, earlier estimates were statistical guesses, based on the number of lakes in a parcel of land or on average lake size. One widely cited study from 2006 estimated the lake total at 304 million.

A new study published Sept. 16 in the journa Geophysical Research Letters sidesteps these problems. With high-resolution satellite data and supercomputers to check every cloudless pixel, researchers now have the best count yet of lakes on Earth. The result? There are 117 million lakes in the world.

Yet the bodies of water cover more land (3.7 percent of Earth’s surface) than previous studies had predicted. This is because quite a few medium- to large-size lakes were missing from the databases used for previous studies.

About 90 million of the lakes fall in the smallest size category, measuring 0.5 to 2.5 acres (0.2 to 1 hectare), the study reports. That’s equal to a country house lot, a large farm pond or 1.9 American football fields.

"Most lakes are in the far North, and there’s actually quite a few of them," said Seekell, a co-author of the new study. "Even if they’re small and no one sees them, they are potentially important for global-scale environmental issues like the carbon budget," he told Live Science.

Continue Reading.

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ashestoashesjc:

I regret nearly everything I did between the ages of birth and however old I was yesterday. 


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beautifulmars:

Layering on a Crater Floor in Icaria Planum

beautifulmars:

Layering on a Crater Floor in Icaria Planum

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aisscube:

euphoric-demise:

gooclra:

themidnightpersona:

Free! - Eternal Summer: Under the Fireworks [Fandub] 

Featuring Jonah Scott!

I’m getting chills from this!

I legit screamed

I would give this 20 likes if I could

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the-magnetic-cat:

Sketch of a temple near my house

the-magnetic-cat:

Sketch of a temple near my house

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xwirsindtraumerx:

spock and uhura. I’m totally in love with them. 

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galaxiesoftheuniverse:

4 of the largest Moons of Jupiter

  1. Io
  2. Ganymede
  3. Europa
  4. Callisto

Io is the innermost of the four Galilean moons of the planet Jupiter and, with a diameter of 3,642 kilometres the fourth-largest moon in the Solar System. Io played a significant role in the development of astronomy in the 17th and 18th centuries. It was discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei, along with the other Galilean satellites. It was named after the mythological character Io, a priestess of Hera who became one of Zeus’s lovers. With over 400 active volcanoes, Io is the most geologically active object in the Solar System.

Ganymede is a satellite of Jupiter and the largest moon in the Solar System. It is the seventh moon and third Galilean satellite outward from Jupiter. Ganymede’s discovery is credited to Galileo Galilei, who was the first to observe it on January 7, 1610.The satellite’s name was soon suggested by astronomer Simon Marius, for the mythological Ganymede, cupbearer of the Greek gods and Zeus’s lover

Europa is the sixth-closest moon of the planet Jupiter, and the smallest of its four Galilean satellites, but still the sixth-largest moon in the Solar System. Europa was discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei and possibly independently by Simon Marius around the same time. It is named after a Phoenician noblewoman in Greek mythology, Europa, who was courted by Zeus and became the queen of Crete

Callisto is a moon of the planet Jupiter. It was discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei. It is the third-largest moon in the Solar System and the second largest in the Jovian system, after Ganymede. Callisto has about 99% the diameter of the planet Mercury but only about a third of its mass. It is the fourth Galilean moon of Jupiter by distance, with an orbital radius of about 1,880,000 km.Callisto is named after one of Zeus's many lovers in Greek mythology.

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bobbycaputo:

Photos of the New York City Subway During the 1980s by Steven Siegel

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